Workers' Compensation

Kentucky Workers' Compensation Lawyer

Workers’ Compensation benefits are meant to provide medical benefits and income to workers who suffer an on-the-job injury or to those who suffer from an occupational disease.  The Kentucky Workers’ Compensation Act streamlines the system so that workers are not required to prove employer negligence. In exchange, you can’t sue your employer for personal injury.

Workplace injuries are, unfortunately, a common occurrence in Kentucky. Common workplace injuries in Kentucky include:

  • Repetitive motion injuries – These types of workplace injuries can be caused by performing the same movement repeatedly or by wear-and-tear from working over long periods. Common repetitive motion injuries include bursitis, carpal tunnel, and tendonitis.

  • Fall-related injuries – Falls are common in the workplace, particularly for those employed in the construction industry. Falls can result in fractures, spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, and death.

  • Auto injuries – Auto injuries that occur while employees are engaged in work-related activities are considered workplace injuries for the purpose of determining workers’ compensation eligibility. In addition, auto accidents can result in separate claims for personal injury, if caused by the negligence of another. Auto accidents can result in a number of serious ailments.

The benefits available under Kentucky workers’ comp laws include:

  • Medical expenses

  • Disability benefits

  • Rehabilitation and retraining

  • Lost wages related to the injury and retraining

  • Death and burial benefits

Kentucky recognizes different levels of disability. Temporary is reserved when you are expected to recover, permanent partial is reserved when you are not expected to recover from a partial disability, and permanent total is reserved when you are not expected to make any significant recovery from a total disability.

An insurance company may argue that your injury or illness is not as bad as it seems. To counter these claims it is important to contact an attorney to advocate on your behalf. 

Injured at Work? Following a workplace injury in Kentucky, the following steps are recommended:

  • Notify a supervisor as soon as possible following the injury – One’s immediate supervisor should be notified of the accident as soon as possible. At a minimum, an injured employee should provide his or her employer with the following information:
    – When and where the accident occurred;
    – How the accident occurred; and
    – The injury symptoms being experienced.

  • Immediately seek medical treatment – As is the case with any injury, medical treatment should be sought as soon as possible following a workplace accident. With some exceptions, an injured employee in Kentucky is free to choose his or her own physician. In addition, an injured employee in Kentucky should ask his or her physician to immediately report the status of the injury and any work limitations to both the insurance carrier and employer, as prompt reporting ensures the quick payment of benefits and assists doctors and employers in facilitating the return of injured employees to work.

  • Consult with a Kentucky workers’ compensation attorney – Even if your workplace injury is being covered by workers compensation, it is highly recommended that you consult with a Kentucky workers’ compensation attorney about your situation. There are time deadlines involved with any injury, and a failure to act promptly can result in the immediate and total loss of benefits, without warning or notice.

Attorney Tate Meagher can guide you through the steps you need to receive your benefits. From filing the initial forms to dealing with difficult insurers and all aspects of the appeal process.

If you have been injured at work, Don’t Wait, Call Tate at (502) 309-9213 to schedule a free consultation now.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

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